King And Miki Two Toes Land Milestone Wins In Farnley

9
Sep

Eight-year-old gelding Miki Two Toes, the oldest and most experienced runner in the Farnley Stakes, scored his first stakes victory and gave trainer Anne King her best win in racing at Belmont on Saturday.

Aided by a perfect ground saving ride from Alan Kennedy, who settled behind the leader from barrier one, Miki Two Toes hugged the fence and scored by a long-neck from favourite Just Act Natural.

The runner-up, who was sent out at $1.90, loomed the winner after reaching the front passing the 100m, but didn’t run out a strong 1400m.  Ihtsahymn ran third after flashing home from last.

The Farnley Stakes victory extended Miki Two Toes’ record to 12 wins and boosted his prize money to a shade under half-a-million dollars.

King, whose previous best wins in racing had been two Port Hedland Cups and one Roebourne Cup, said Miki Two Toes, a son of Patronize, will target the Hannans Handicap (1400m) in Kalgoorlie on September 20.

King believes Miki Two Toes deserves another shot at Kalgoorlie’s premier sprint race after he ran an unlucky eighth to Royal Rada two years ago.

“We will have another crack at the Hannans because he was a little unlucky last time,” King said.

Meanwhile Chris Gangemi’s big opinion of Floyd was validated when the Not A Single Doubt gelding scored a scintillating win in the Heineken 3 Handicap (1000m).

The four-year-old was narrowly beaten when first up a fortnight back, but stormed back when he led and cleared away to defeat his next rival, Blitzem Someday, by a dominant 5 ½ lengths.

Floyd’s third win from six starts gave Jarrad Noske the second leg of a riding double and in an ominous warning to his rivals, Gangemi said his charge still had plenty of improvement left in him.

“He was a bit fitter and showed what we had been expecting for a while now,” Gangemi said.

“He was not one hundred per cent fit so he will have no problems running out 1200 or 1400m.

“Although it was just a graduation it wasn’t a weak race and hopefully he can go through the classes.”

Julio Santarelli